Title

Enhancing Teacher Credibility: What We Can Learn from the Justice and Leadership Literature

Department/School

Management

Date of this version

2016

Document Type

Article

Keywords

Actionable research, classroom design, classroom management, implicit leadership theory, instructor credibility, justice

Abstract

Enhanced perceptions of instructor credibility are related to positive outcomes in the classroom, including participation and learning (Chory, 2007; Frymier & Thompson, 1992; McCroskey & Teven, 1999; Myers, 2004; Teven & McCroskey, 1997). We contend that student perceptions of instructor credibility can be directly impacted by applying management research to classroom practices. In other words, actionable management research is useful in the classroom not just to share with students because it may make them better managers, but also to improve teaching practices and related outcomes. The present article explores this tenet, first discussing why we believe applied research findings can and should be transferred to the classroom and then using Implicit Leadership Theory (ILT) and organizational justice literature to demonstrate how these concepts can be generalized to the classroom environment to ultimately enhance instructor credibility.

Published in

Organization Management Journal

Citation/Other Information

13(2), 90-100