Title

Race, Religion, and Immigration: Experimental Evidence from the Labor Market

Department/School

Economics

Date

2021

Document Type

Article

Keywords

discrimination, race/ethnicity, immigration, resume audit

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1007/s41996-021-00079-0

Abstract

In this project, we examine employers’ response to Black immigrants compared to native-born Black Americans. Between July 2017 and December 2018, we applied to publicly advertised positions using fictitious resumes that are manipulated on perceived race and ethnicity (Somali American, African American, and white American). We examine the proportion of resumes that are contacted by employers. We find that male African American applicants are 5 percentage points less likely to be contacted than equivalent white American applicants. Somali American applicants are 11 percentage points less likely to be contacted by employers than equivalent white American applicants and 6 percentage points less likely to be contacted than equivalent African American applicants. For female applicants, the effects followed a similar pattern, but were muted. Signals of language ability, education, and religiosity showed little impact on the proportion contacted by an employer.

Volume

5

Issue

2

Published in

Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy

Citation/Other Information

Gorzig, M. M., & Rho, D. (2021). Race, Religion, & Immigration: Experimental Evidence from the Labor Market. Journal of Economics, Race, and Policy, 5(2), 75-97. https://doi.org/10.1007/s41996-021-00079-0

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