Event Title

Idealized Imperfection

Presenter Information

Date

2020

Location

Department of Art History Gallery, O'Shaughnessy Educational Center Lobby

Start Date

3-2-2020 12:00 AM

Description

EXHIBITION CLOSED: In consideration of the health and safety of all, the Department of Art History Gallery will be temporarily closed. As we continue to monitor and do our part in containing the spread of COVID-19, we will reopen when safe to do so.

An exploration into the spiritual dimension of human experience, Idealized Imperfection showcases two artists who expand on contemporary life while utilizing historical traditions and text. Inspired by Orthodox iconography and fashion photography, Natalia Berglund’s paintings are a commentary on the modern ideals of femininity. Kelly Kruse blends sacred text and personal reflection to create illuminated paintings that consider the duality between time and the reality of pain. While appearing to be idyllic, contemplation and reflection allows the viewer to witness the limitations in life through this visual dialogue.

In memory of Dr. Shelly Nordtorp-Madson, teacher, mentor, colleague, and friend.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art History and the Sacred Arts Festival.

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Feb 3rd, 12:00 AM

Idealized Imperfection

Department of Art History Gallery, O'Shaughnessy Educational Center Lobby

EXHIBITION CLOSED: In consideration of the health and safety of all, the Department of Art History Gallery will be temporarily closed. As we continue to monitor and do our part in containing the spread of COVID-19, we will reopen when safe to do so.

An exploration into the spiritual dimension of human experience, Idealized Imperfection showcases two artists who expand on contemporary life while utilizing historical traditions and text. Inspired by Orthodox iconography and fashion photography, Natalia Berglund’s paintings are a commentary on the modern ideals of femininity. Kelly Kruse blends sacred text and personal reflection to create illuminated paintings that consider the duality between time and the reality of pain. While appearing to be idyllic, contemplation and reflection allows the viewer to witness the limitations in life through this visual dialogue.

In memory of Dr. Shelly Nordtorp-Madson, teacher, mentor, colleague, and friend.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Art History and the Sacred Arts Festival.