The Hemingway Bibliography
 

Title

Decolonizing the Native Conch in Ernest Hemingway’s To Have and Have Not: Harry Morgan as a Cautionary Tale against Tourism

Document Type

Essay

Citation

Pridemore, Adam. “Decolonizing the Native Conch in Ernest Hemingway’s To Have and Have Not: Harry Morgan as a Cautionary Tale against Tourism.” In Florida Studies Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association, edited by Steve Glassman and Karen Tolchin, 91-97. Newcastle upon Tyne, England: Cambridge Scholars, 2007.

Annotation

Drawing on postcolonial theory, Pridemore argues that To Have and Have Not “predicts, confirms, and bemoans the commercialization and exploitation that have become second nature to the conflicted neocolonial colossus that is the United States of America.” Sees tourists as the ultimate colonizers, corrupting and destroying the native culture of Key West to meet the prescribed cultural representation of their dominant imagination. Argues that while Harry may lament the burning down of shacks to make room for tourist apartments, his recognition in the end is not enough to stop the rampant commercialism that surrounds him.

Published in

Florida Studies Proceedings of the 2006 Annual Meeting of the Florida College English Association

Date

2007

Pages

91-97

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